Favourite Albums of 2018, #15 to #11

#15. Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino, Arctic Monkeys

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I’ll admit it – I didn’t quite get into this album when it first came out. But with time, when I immersed myself in its space, its operatic ambition and its Bowiesque music, I was hooked. Alex Turner can really sell the eccentricity, leaning on the mic with his leather jacket on, cigarette and a glass of whisky in hand while soaring through the cosmos, all while ruminating on the existential ridiculousness we all find ourselves entangled in everyday. Strap yourself in, and let this cosmic aural journey take you over.

Listen to: Star Treatment, Four Out of Five

#14. abysskiss, Adrianne Lenkerabysskiss.jpg

Adrianne Lanker’s deceptively tender voice anchors much melancholy, tender reeds simultaneously weighed down by and free of death, self-harm and loss. An intimate, straightforward musical presentation, abysskiss is all about giving into the deepest recesses of your hurt, and finding some solace in knowing that you are not alone in your strife. Sometimes, that knowledge is all you need.

Listen to: terminal paradise, what can you say

#13. Some Rap Songs, Earl Sweatshirt

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What a weird fucking album. What a wonderful fucking album. Earl’s rhymes are as sharp as ever, but his words carry more weight, his accelerated coming-of-age and the recent death of his father fracturing his soul and revealing his depths. Choosing such a pockmarked, garish soundscape for these words only goes to amplify his chaos, while seemingly burying any sense of comfortable musicality. This is Earl’s zenith so far; but it’s clear he’s got a lot more artistry to draw on.

Listen to: Nowhere2go, The Bends

#12. Con Todo El Mundo, Khruangbin

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This deliberately paced, sprawling record is a testament to how much you can achieve with pure instruments and a lot of imagination. Khruangbin’s low-key funk, invoking a blend of oriental and desert rock styles, slithers into your ear with stealth, yet adamance. An album to lounge in, Con Todo El Mundo defies the limitations of instrumental music to form a gently shifting sand dune of sound that indulges its influences while shaping a personality all its own.

Listen to: Como Me Quieres, Como Te Quiero

#11. Trench, Twenty One Pilots

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By far, one of the catchiest, best mainstream albums of the year, Trench is everything pop-rock should be. It’s thoughtful but not pretentious, knows its audience but never insults their intelligence, and is packed full of impeccable production and clean vocals. Whether you buy into its conceptuality or not, the album’s full of meticulously crafted songs with meaningful content that should make any listener sit up and listen, and then just enjoy.

Listen to: Morph, Bandito

 

Favourite Albums of 2018, #15 to #11

Favourite Albums of 2018: #20 to #16

#20. Whack World, Tierra Whack

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15 minutes, 15 tracks. Who knew you could pack so much wonderful weirdness into a minute of music? Tierra offers colourful glimpses of her world, which looks a lot like ours, with all the confusion of coming of age in our times, and some quirky positivity added in to buoy our view. But this isn’t a gimmick album – Tierra’s inventiveness, in the breezy way she presents resonant themes, is one that’s sorely needed in a musical landscape that’s often accused of stagnant unoriginality. We’re all better off for it.

Watch/listen to the whole thing. It’s worth 15 minutes of your time.

#19. Delta, Mumford and Sons

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Ah, the critic’s favourite punching bag – and one of my personal favourite bands. Mumford and Sons have been making earnest music for a while now, and I have found myself in several of their songs. Delta might not make it to the end-of-year lists, but it’s a gorgeously crafted collection of songs that elevate Marcus Mumford’s rousing vocals to their emotional zenith, with a soundscape that moves with glacial grace. Music only needs to reach the listener’s heart and stir something in it – nevermind Pitchfork’s diatribes.

Listen to: Woman, Rose of Sharon

#18. Freedom, Amen Dunes

Favourite Albums of 2018: #20 to #16

Favourite Albums of 2018 – #30 to #26

2018 has been a personal roller coaster, often going at breakneck speeds. In such times, music has continued to be one of the most important ways I slow down and remind myself of the anchors I care about – and the lenses through which I viewed the wider world. These are the albums that etched themselves in my ear, my heart and my mind.

#30. Championships, Meek Mill

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Meek Mill deserves every accolade he gets this year. A symbol of weathered triumph in a country that’s stacked against people of colour, Meek digs into the depths of his struggle, every ounce of pain evident in his impassioned vocals, every moment of redemption bursting in the more upbeat tracks. Championships strikes the balance between socially conscious and personally joyful music in a way that signifies the mantle Meek has clearly fought to take on.

Listen to: Oodles O’Noodles Babies, Uptown Vibes ft. Fabolous and Anuel AA

Continue reading “Favourite Albums of 2018 – #30 to #26”

Favourite Albums of 2018 – #30 to #26

Favourite Albums of 2017 – #25 to #21

Music in 2017 continues to soundtrack turbulent affairs in the world around us, as well as the spectrum of experiences and emotions in our own lives. It acts as our balm, a way to center our lives, a means to filter the haze of our environment through a tangible medium. What we choose to listen to, and that which buries itself in the depths of our craving psyche, possibly defines our times better than any other media that accompanies our days. In that vein, these are some of those albums that impressed themselves on the messy canvas of my year.

#25. War & Leisure, Miguel

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Miguel is perhaps the trust successor to the legacy of funk-infused, deeply sensual R&B that the legendary Prince pioneered. For Miguel, lust and love are the lenses through which he views the decidedly unerotic state of our world. The result is a rich, contemporary distillation of the aggression of war and the peace of leisure into the battlegrounds of our bodies and hearts. The man’s vocals find a sweet spot between seductive and soaring, an oasis of auditory pleasure in a dreary desert seemingly losing its grip on the joys of sexuality. Thankfully, Miguel makes it his mission on War & Leisure to remind us of that most raw desire of life.

Listen to: Sky Walker feat. Travis Scott, City of Angels

#24. Painted Ruins, Grizzly Bear

Grizzly Bear has making music for over 15 years, and they have assembled a veritable collection of musings on the seemingly pedestrian parts of our seemingly pedestrian lives. These thoughts are front and center on Painted Ruins, peeling back the mundane every-isms to reveal our bloodened lives. The words are painted on a canvas of familiar sounds, embellished by vibrant strokes that find the grooves in between the larger pieces, brightening the whole. This is an album that frontman Ed Droste has made a career of making – but every time, it works beautifully. “It’s chaos, but it works.”

Listen to: Morning SoundNeighbors

#23. No Dope on Sundays, CyHi the Prynce

This is the album I’ve waited on since CyHi the Prynce delivered one of the best verses on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy on So Appalled. I’ve been waiting on this album since CyHi proved himself capable of crafting a cohesive, thoughtful body of work on Black Hystori Project. And he finally presents his debut album – and how. Over gritty, purposeful production, CyHi delivers street sermons that go deeper than the punchlines. Hell, even the punchlines often land a sharp thought unadulterated by forced cleverness. This is an MC who’s carefully honed to his craft to a level where he just needs to concentrate on laying his thoughts bare, and you’re listening. Whether he’s on the block or in the pews, with No Dope on Sundays, CyHi proves he isn’t going to be preaching to the choir.

Listen to: Dat Side feat. Kanye West, No Dope on Sundays feat. Pusha T

#22. All-Amerikkkan Bada$$, Joey Bada$$

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Honestly, I’ve typically been ambivalent about Joey Bada$$. 1999 was a grimey, lofi debut that nevertheless announced the arrival of a shockingly talented young rapper on the scene who harkened back to the glory days of New York hip-hop. But there’s only so much you can rap about rapping, trying to show off technical proficiency while skimping on musical quality, as was the case on later releases. But Joey has evolved into an artist on All-Amerikkkan Bada$$, creating a thought-provoking examination of USA 2017, in the voice of a young man with the soul of an old head. His lyrical acrobats are just as impressive as ever, often outshining his previous skills, but they’re employed towards greater goals – storytelling, introspection and analysis of a harsh world. This is a focused project with enjoyable meanderings, establishing Joey as not just an MC, but a musician. It’s no wonder Cole gifted him that stellar verse on Legendary – it’s a recognition of maturity from an elder rapper who’s been through this journey himself.

Listen to: Land of the Free, Rockabye Baby feat. ScHoolboy Q

#21. Take Me Apart, Kelela

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I love the resurgence and evolution that R&B has undergone in the past half-decade. Kelela personifies of a brand of Afrofuturism that is bold and alluring, an inescapable vortex of electrifying music. The blend of crystalline vocals and spacey production is assured send chills through your very soul – it’s a transcendental experience. If Gambino looked to the stars from our planet on Awaken, My Love, Kelela effortlessly travels to the cosmos and creates music infused with the stars themselves. Close your eyes, and let her silken voice elevate you. Take Me Apart is beyond music.

Listen to: Blue Light, LMK

 

 

Favourite Albums of 2017 – #25 to #21

An Outsider’s Ode to Hip Hop – Part 2

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Part 1 is here

Nas is indisputably one of the greatest MCs to ever grace the mic, as hip hop as rappers go. From what is widely considered one of, if not the best rap album ever, the gritty, streetwise Illmatic, up to the grown-man, nuanced, elegant hip hop on Life is Good, his discography is a play-by-play of the evolution of the genre through the eyes of one of its finest.

When he declared, then, that his beloved form of expression was “dead” halfway through his career on Hip Hop is Dead, then, the outburst of conversation was understandable. Fast forward 10 years, and Nas declares himself a proper fan of Future, the divisive rapper scores of hip hop heads declared as antithetical to “real hip hop.” He’d go on to explain his history with the genre on the watershed DJ Khaled track, Hip Hop with Scarface.

Continue reading “An Outsider’s Ode to Hip Hop – Part 2”

An Outsider’s Ode to Hip Hop – Part 2

Quick Thoughts – Imagine Dragons, Calvin Harris and Young Thug

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#1. Evolve by Imagine Dragons

 

 

 

Imagine Dragons are at the forefront of the wave of pop/electronic rock bands that can make some great anthems and fill up concerts with their sing-alongs, but cannot for the life of them, put together a great album. Every track on the mercifully short Evolve is driven by stadium-sized drums and vocals, and poppy synths that are earworms at best, and ear-gratingly bad at worst.

Dan Reynolds is a talented vocalist, and puts up an earnest performance throughout. He can lift songs to incredibly satisfying highs when done right, such as on the epic Believer, Whatever it Takes, (where Dan employs a hip-hop cadence on the verses) and Rise Up. Whether these songs are good is debatable, but they accomplish what they set out to do – fill your headphones with an overwhelming passion, that stirs something in you, like it or not.

Continue reading “Quick Thoughts – Imagine Dragons, Calvin Harris and Young Thug”

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Crack-Up by Fleet Foxes

Describing music with shimmering instrumentation and rich vocals as ‘beautiful’ is easy. But rare is music that sounds beautiful, as much as it feels beautiful – music that captures the many intricacies of our world and emotions in its own flourishes. This music is not superficially pleasant – often, it might deal with powerful themes that ordinary men and women are left to grapple with. But the result is immensely evocative, vivid in its detailing.

Musicians that can create truly beautiful music, then, are to be treasured; Fleet Foxes is among them, and Crack-Up is a stunning work of music, and art.

Continue reading “Crack-Up by Fleet Foxes”

Crack-Up by Fleet Foxes