Pretty Girls Like Trap Music by 2 Chainz

Atlanta has been hugely responsible in influencing the sound of hip hop for decades; from the funky, rich bassline-driven smooth raps of OutKast, to the gritty, straight-talking trap of T.I. and Jeezy, to the mood- driven sing-rapping of Future and Young Thug, the city has kept evolving its sound, and consequentially, that of the genre.

2 Chainz, having blown up somewhere between the aggressiveness of trap and the melodies of ‘mumble rap,’ has had an unsteady career path from dropping the (unfortunate) Tity Boi moniker to the present day. With Pretty Girls Like Trap Music (PGLTM), however, 2 Chainz seems to have hit upon a winning formula – his trademark punchlines are intact and often strikingly clever, and so is the sneer from his trap origins, but it’s complemented by great, memorable harmonies in the production and vocals that clear some of the grit. The result is the best album of Tauheed Epps’ career, and possibly one of the best of the year.

From the introductory Saturday Night, the mood of the album is clear. A guitar riff that sounds straight from the days of glam rock drives the track from underneath trap 808s, and 2 Chainz sounds more purposeful than he’s ever been. He establishes the dichotomy which defines PGLTM, of the trap and the club, the danger of the streets and the wealth, from the get-go. And surprisingly for a 2 Chainz project, the LP remains impressively cohesive.

When Epps decides to really make a trap song, he sounds focused and more confident than in his past work. Unlike the many pauses that unfortunately stunted his past flows, he fills out every space of the song here, and with much more heft. It’s not filled with empty boasts and threats; they’re weighted with the words of a man with more than a few years in the game. Riverdale Rd. is imposing and detailed, Door Swangin is that rare good filler and the run from the classic Southern Rolls Royce Bitch to OG Kush Diet is trap like few mainstream rappers do nowadays, particularly for deep cuts in the age of singles. 2 Chainz tackles his trials and tribulations in the trap, as well his successes, and makes it clear that his concerns are personal, rapping “I’m no Black activist/
I’m a Black millionaire, give you my Black ass to kiss.” It might make for a contentious statement, but it’s an odd authenticity – 2 Chainz isn’t here to be Kendrick.

Where the LP truly stands out though, is in its crossover potential without compromising its street appeal. Good Drank has proved its worth as a single, with a hypnotic Mike Dean beat that the rappers on it turn into the smoothest banger – that Quavo hook is an absolute earworm. Following it up with 4 AM is a one-two punch, it’s sinister, with one of Travis Scott’s better hooks, and Epps bringing his best in the lyrics department. Realize is definitely not what you expect from a 2 Chainz song with a Nicki feature, but its psychedelic beat and stellar verses make it a contender for one of the best songs on the LP. The only misstep in Chainz’ hitmaking attempts is the Pharrell-assisted Bailian; the instrumental sounds out of place here and both P and 2 Chainz sound rather bored.

Pretty Girls Like Trap Music is an unexpected album – it’s 2 Chainz at his most confident, lyrical and focussed. And he’s grown up – he’s settling into the self-assured role of the middle-aged rapper with more grace than I’d expected. The Louis Farrakhan sample on Burglar Bars speaks of Tauheed Epps’ not merely as a rapper, but as a presence. With this album, 2 Chainz has laid his claim to those words ringing truer than ever before.

Pretty Girls Like Trap Music by 2 Chainz